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Unifix Cube Measurement

 
Concept: Measurement using Unifix Cubes
Grade Range: First Grade
Objectives: Given Unifix Cubes, students will be able to estimate and to measure the lengths  of four objects using the Unifix Cubes with 50% accuracy.
Terms: Measurement, Length, Estimate
Materials Needed:
Teacher
1 Measurement Record Sheet for each student
Students
Unifix Cubes
Student Name Tags
Cover of Tupperware Bin
Procedure:
Plan A
Introduction/Prior Knowledge: Ask students if they know what the word "measurement" means. Also, ask them if they have ever measured anything, and why a person might want to measure something. Allow time for ideas to be shared and discussed.
Concept Development: Pass out Unifix Cubes to the class. There should be at least 20 Unifix Cubes per person. Hold up a pencil and ask students how they think they could measure the pencil using Unifix Cubes. After students share their ideas, show them how they can measure the length of a pencil by stacking Unifix Cubes. Next, tell them that they should first "guess" or "estimate" how many cubes they think they will need to measure their pointer finger. Then, have them measure their pointer finger and report back their results to the class. Have each student hold up the Unifix Cube rod that is the same length as his/her pointer finger.
Practice: Continue guiding students through several more examples as a class (ex.—colored pencil boxes, crayons, math books, etc.). Then, for independent practice, pair each student with a partner and have them complete the Measurement Record Sheet. First, they must make estimates sitting in their seats and have them checked off by the teacher. Then, they may move around and do the actual measurements. Note: Number 2 on the Measurement Record Sheet refers to a storage bin in which each student (in the class for which this lesson was designed) keeps his/her belongings.
Plan B (extension): If students have already begun to do basic measurements, have them experiment with different measurement tools. After they have explored several types of objects that could be used for measurement, have each table decide on a favorite measurement tool and explain why they chose this tool.
Plan C (simplification): If students do not understand the basic concepts of measurement using Unifix Cubes, use a larger unit of measure. This way, students have are less confused by a large number of Unifix Cubes and have a larger concrete manipulative with which to work.
Discussion and Closure: After students have completed their Measurement Record Sheets, reconvene as a class to discuss the results of each pair of students. If there are large discrepancies between students’ responses, measure and count the items together. Ask students if their estimates differed greatly from their results, and talk about why that may have happened. Allow time for questions.

 

 

Measurement Record Sheet

Bobby Bulldog needs your help. He does not know how to measure things, and he wants you to show him how. First, estimate the length of each object. Then, using Unifix Cubes, measure the length of each item and record it on your paper.

 

 

 

 

1. Your Name Tag

Estimate                                        

Length in Unifix Cubes                                       

 

2. The Cover of Your Bin

Estimate                                       

Length in Unifix Cubes                                       

 

3. The Middle of Your Table

Estimate                                       

Length in Unifix Cubes                                       

 

4. A Person from Head to Foot (Hint: Lay down on the carpet and measure the length of a person from his/her head to his/her feet.)

Estimate                                       

Length in Unifix Cubes                                       

 

 

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